Soil sensorExamples of joint research/proving tests, installation methods

「Under development」*Specifications are subject to change without notice.

Examples of joint research

Examples of joint research with Calbee Potato

Figure 1 of Examples of joint research
Figure 2 of Examples of joint research
Image 1 of irrigated and not irrigated
Image 2 of irrigated and not irrigated

Examples of proving tests

Examples of the diversity of growing methods

Image 1 of Examples of the diversity of growing methods
Figure 1 of nutrient solution concentration adjusted during the growing period Nutrient solution concentration adjusted during the growing period
Figure 2 of nutrient solution concentration adjusted during the growing period
Figure of Tube positioning adjusted during the growing period Tube positioning adjusted during the growing period

Examples of water retaining capacity of different soil textures

Comparison image of plateau brown forest soil and humus brown forest soil
Comparison image of water content at depth of 10cm
Comparison image of water content at depth of 20cm

Soil texture and water movement can vary substantially from one area to the next; irrigation plans must account for the water retaining capacity of each individual field.

Projected soil drying and irrigation plans

Figure of Projected soil drying and irrigation plans

Identifying the relationship between insolation/precipitation and water content and pairing it with weather forecasts makes it possible to propose better irrigation plans.
It also makes it possible to reduce unnecessary irrigation work.

Examples of other proving tests

Observing soil salinity in outdoor test fields of chloride damage-preventing rice

Vietnam: Observing optimal fertilizer content in dragonfruit orchards

Vietnam: Observing salinity in highly saline rice paddies and irrigation channels for pomelo

Vietnam: Observing salinity from dry-season seawater inflow on the Mekong River

Observing water/fertilizer content for improving quality/yields for various crops

Observing the impact of irrigation on saline groundwater in peanut fields

Added value created by soil sensors

Increase yields

Understand water and fertilizer content

Irrigate efficiently

Understand the extent of chloride infiltration in soil

Understand 3D distributions of water and fertilizer in soil

Understand why yields differ between fields and greenhouses

Understand the different mechanisms of ammonium nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen

Stabilize yields from year to year

Recommended methods of installing soil sensors

Sensors are able to measure volumetric water content (VWC) and pore EC in soil for a range of 7 cm to either side, and 7 cm downward. Install sensors with the EC sensor (the nine-electrode side) facing up, and the water content sensor facing down. Install each sensor such that the surface of the EC sensor is at the desired depth below the ground surface.

Image of recommended methods of installing soil sensors

Recommended Installation Method 1: For hard soil

1
Dig a hole for the sensor.
2
Use a sieve to shake fine soil into the hole.
3
Press the sensor into the soil, and move it back and forth to settle it in farther.
4
With the sensor secured in place, use a sieve to shake soil over the top.
5
After covering the sensor with some fine soil, mix in soil from the surroundings, and continue covering the sensor until it is fully buried.

Recommended Installation Method 2: For soft soil

1
Dig a hole for the sensor.
2
Insert the sensor into the sidewall of the hole. Push the entire sensor into the sidewall.
The picture above shows a sensor being installed 10 cm below the ground surface.
Image of Direction of insertion (EC sensor surface facing up)
3
Fill in the hole.

Sensors continue to function in the soil after they are installed, even with irrigation, making it possible to obtain measurement data in real time.